It is currently Sat 23 Jan 2021 04:27 GMT
Change font size

Health and medical matters

Baby Healthcare in first 3 months in Ontario

Let's hope you'll feel better when you've looked in here!

Baby Healthcare in first 3 months in Ontario

Postby nixons » Fri 11 Jan 2008 23:58 GMT

We will be moving to Ontario (Toronto area) in May 2008, with a two month old baby and a two year old.

We realise that we will not be eligable for the OHIP for the first three months so need private health insurance. Does anyone know of other inurance companies other than Canadsure.com?

Our main concern is that the two month old will need jabs at some point within our first three months in Ontario, does anyone know how much this will cost or whether any insurers will cover this?

Can you register with a GP before the first three months are up? In order to get baby check ups etc.
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
nixons
Free member
 
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu 10 Jan 2008 23:07 GMT
Location: Belfast, N. Ireland

Postby jessica » Sat 12 Jan 2008 13:21 GMT

no I personally don't know of any other travel insurance companies. Just done a search on here (I'm sure you've already done that) and only Canadasure is coming up. I'm sure there are other companies :? maybe google can help?

Re the baby's immunisations - there are 4 month and 6 month (DTP, Polio, Hib and Pneumo conjugate) recommended immunisations but if they're not covered by the private health insurance, I'm sure the baby can wait a month (I know my daughter's were all, ahem, late :oops: )

I'm also not sure about registering with a GP before receiving your health card (the receptionists ask for that green card before you even open your mouth to say hello) , but I just wanted to say (before you get your hopes up) I live in LOndon, about two hours away from Toronto and there is a terrible dr shortage - we've finally got one after three years. Paediatricians are more easily available for your children's care and walk-in clinics (both for adults and paediatric clinics) are everywhere.

I was quite shocked by the lack of drs. That's one thing they don't mention on all the city websites :evil:
"Cheese is nice and jumping is fun" Libby (age 3)
Posted by:
jessica
Supporter
 
Posts: 1092
Joined: Tue 16 Mar 2004 19:34 GMT
Location: London, Ontario

Postby aiglee » Sun 13 Jan 2008 03:02 GMT

Hi nixons, check Manulife, is a private health insurance company here in Canada that has special plans for newcomers and you can sign with them over the Internet.
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
aiglee
Free member
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed 15 Nov 2006 13:42 GMT
Location: Toronto, Canada

Postby nixons » Tue 15 Jan 2008 22:05 GMT

Checked the Manulife website and could not find any special plans for newcomers. Did you use a plan from Manulife? If so do you remember the name of the policy?
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
nixons
Free member
 
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu 10 Jan 2008 23:07 GMT
Location: Belfast, N. Ireland

Postby aiglee » Sat 19 Jan 2008 18:19 GMT

Hi Nixon, sorry I didn't reply before!!!

Here is the link:

And in case, they take out the link (although I don't work for Manulife or anything like that) [Comment by Site Admin - the posting guidelines explain our policy on links and the reason for it], you have to go to ManuLife web page, from there select "buy insurance online", then "CoverMe - Health", then "Visitors to Canada", and if you plan to stay in the province for the first 3 months, just go with the single trip option ;)
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
aiglee
Free member
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed 15 Nov 2006 13:42 GMT
Location: Toronto, Canada

Postby CanadianMom » Tue 12 Feb 2008 18:06 GMT

"Healthy Babies, Healthy Children" program run by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services is something to look into. Also you can contact the local public health unit and definitely access Ontario's "Early Years Centres" for connecting/support/advice for newborns up to six years of age. Fantastic, free resources. Questions about qualifying, finding care could be answered there. The Early Years Centres are all over Ontario and fantastic. Here is the gov't page with links to "Healthy Babies,Healthy Children", public health units, and Early Years Centres. :D
Also check out new immigrant gov't sites-they do try to make programs accessible to newcomers-happy to help direct you.
www.children.gov.on.ca/mcys/english/pro ... /index.asp
Yes the doctor shortage is lousy here. TRUE! Cutbacks to medical programs in the early 1990's(recession) created a lack of qualified doctors graduating 10 years later. Plus retiring doctors, and the gov't not making it easy for foreign trained doctors to practise(WHY we continue to ask!) creates a big problem.
Phone and see who is accepting patients(hospitals and private practices). Ask to be put on a waiting list(do that for many). Every year docs tend to add some patients to make up for those who have died/moved. Also watch carefully because once in a while a new doctor arrives and accepts patients. They fill very quickly. In a week or so. Walk in clinics are not great for care by my doctor's admission(miss alot/no follow up/can't send for tests-thats what my dr's office says). Be better to go to the hospital for most things. You end up going there alot of the time anyway(because needing tests). But for minor things it will do. Originally they were set up to provide relief for emergency room wait times for minor ailments. Now my nurse told me they have been told to advise patients to just GO to emerg for most things as it costs the system twice . Once for a visit to walk-in then either you are sent to the hospital where they can actually do what is required or a visit to your doctor so he can order tests. :(
Sometimes you can't jump the qeue, other times if you play up your situation and have a sympathetic nurse you may succeed getting a doctor who otherwise isn't really accepting patients. I hate to admit it. :roll:
We moved back to a rural area last year where there are only a few doctors with astounding numbers of patients. I called around. Because my old doctor was still within driving distance(under an hour) I was put on the low priority list for new patients. Maybe within 1 year I would get a call I was told. At first when they thought I was completely without a doctor and had moved from afar I was told I would have been accepted or put at the top of the list. I happened to walk in to my old doctors office spur of the moment (hadn't been back in 20 years), told them truthfully I have a family doc, and I was looking for acceptance for my entire family-and didn't expect to be high priority. I was told yes the next day! Apparently 3 seniors had died the prior week in the local nursing home and they were all this dr's patients. So, you never know. Having little ones, esp a newborn I think would help your case findinga doctor more quickly. They want to track that child's progress and take vaccinations very seriously! Just my opinion.
On the flip side-our smaller hospitals are quieter and you get seen very quickly-many times immediately-day or night. In the cities-no.
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
CanadianMom
Free member
 
Posts: 128
Joined: Tue 11 Dec 2007 05:01 GMT
Location: SW Ontario


Return to Health and medical matters



cron