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Health and medical matters

NS Healthcare - in particular, baby related questions

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NS Healthcare - in particular, baby related questions

Postby TrinnyV » Tue 12 Feb 2008 15:40 GMT

Hi all,

We are hoping to move to NS in the not too distant future. Once we've arrived, we're likely to be ready to start trying for our second child.

I know that I will almost certainly need a cesarian. Is this going to cost us the earth?

Also, is NS one of the Provinces that deducts a percentage of your salary for healthcare, or would we need private insurance? If private insurance would I need to declare the likely need for a cesarian straight off to make sure it would be covered?

Any advice would be fab.

Thanks

Trinny
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Postby carolinedraper » Tue 12 Feb 2008 23:05 GMT

Health care is paid for through the taxes. And a C section is covered here in NS under the NS health card.

I have no idea regarding Private Health Cover as we were lucky enough to get cards before getting ill. We just took the chance and set money aside rather it earnt interest in our pockets than an insurers...

I know that I was pregnant before the 3 month wait was up and paid $10 per doctor check up - blood tests were extra and the scan was $150 plus $10 for the photo.

If you have work / study permits than all your pregnancy is covered other than mid wives who are not recognised here and so you have to pay them privately. However we gave birth in Kentville (most people do), and the doctors and nurses were better than the midwifery treatment I got in the UK with our first born.
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Postby TrinnyV » Wed 13 Feb 2008 17:48 GMT

Excellent news, thank you very much! :D
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Postby TrinnyV » Wed 13 Feb 2008 20:23 GMT

Just thought of a couple of extra questions. Is the healthcare money taken though an income tax or another form? If it is income, and I am not working, will my husband's tax/healthcare contribution cover all of us?

We are intending to go to NS as visitors first, look for work for my husband then get his work permit, then apply for PR at that stage. I assume I'd need to wait until we were permanent residents before I could expect any healthcare benefits?
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Postby carolinedraper » Thu 14 Feb 2008 02:16 GMT

OK, here is how it works.

For us we can over as Seasonal Residents first and then applied for all our permits and PR from NS -We sent our stuff to London UK though in 2006.

Thus by the time my Study permit had come and with that my work permit as I was on an ECE course which meant I had to do work placements, and with that also Hubby's open work permit we had already been here for the alloted 3 month wait.

I was enrolled on my course but hubby had yet to find work.

Our son was covered as we both had coverage. Although when on permits you are only covered for a year - you have to keep reapplying.

Now if your hubby gets a job and that takes him 3 months to find then once you send proof of the work permit to NS Health then you automatically get the health card and you will both be covered. They cover the spouse and children of the main permit holder.

As long as your hubby holds a valid work permit then you are both covered. You do not need to wait until you personally have PR.

You file your own tax returns here even if you do not work but your husband does you must file a return so you are in the system. The health care is taken through the tax you pay its automatically accounted for.

When filing your return take care to claim back all medical related expenses e.g gas costs to get to doctor / hospital, parking meter costs you can claim it all.
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Postby TrinnyV » Fri 15 Feb 2008 16:06 GMT

Blimey, that sounds great! Much better than I ever expected.

Thanks so much for taking the time to explain all of that!

Trinny
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Postby carolinedraper » Fri 15 Feb 2008 19:13 GMT

My pleasure just glad it made sense....

MSI are really helpful and are very happy to explain stuff over the phone.

Do not hesitate to call them once you are over here, and as a rule of thumb keep every reciept!!!!!!!
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Postby Buddyboy » Sun 24 Aug 2008 17:35 GMT

Just a few more words about health care in Nova Scotia. First, if you are a permanent resident in Nova Scotia your health care is covered. It matters not whether or not you are employed or pay taxes. You must apply for and obtain a health card as soon as you arrive. Unlike some other provinces, including Ontario, there is no waiting period before coverage kicks in.

I have lived in the U.K., in Ontario and, since 2001, in Nova Scotia. In my experience (and I stress that) the health care here in Canada is far superior to that in the U.K. When I moved from Ontario to Nova Scotia, I was moving from a populous, relatively rich province to a sparsely populated, much poorer province. I fully expected that the one area I would lose out on would be the quality of health care. Boy, was I wrong! My wife and I have found health care in NS to be by far the best we have experienced anywhere. It truly is health "care". Bottom line, if you become a permanent resident here in Nova Scotia, you need have few if any worries about your health coverage. Nonetheless it pays to read up on what coverage is provided from all sources.,
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Postby carolinedraper » Mon 25 Aug 2008 14:39 GMT

Totally agree with you re health care in Canada v UK. In fact hubby got seen quicker here then he did when he went via BUPA through his work in the UK.

I find in general and please do not take that as blanket, but most staff have more time and respect.

Even changing over from NS health coverage to our Ontario one was soooo easy.
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