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Poland

Moving to Poland

Moving to Poland

Postby UKer » Mon 20 Feb 2006 11:12 GMT

I love the UK, I really do. I have lived in about five countries now and the none of them are perfect, but the UK seems to shade it above the rest (well, in summer anyway!!).

Having said that, I am thinking about moving to Poland in a couple of years. I have a house there already down in the mountains, and my wife is Polish. We also have a daughter (two soon) and would like another one in the next year or so.

I have two concerns, both linked. Coming back in old age, and my job (I work in IT). The reason I am thinking about moving is that having a much slower pace of life is quite appealing (I am 31). I could work on a farm or as a labourer during summer, and maybe work on the skifields in winter (not skiing necessarily!). Failing that, there is a reasonable size town not too far away (Novy Targ) and I am sure I could pick something up (maybe teaching English). Hell, I could even do something completely different like learn to be a builder, plumber, plaster, or something. My house here should be mortgage free by then, so I intend to live off the rent from that (I could easily get £750/month currently, but even on £500 I would be OK), as well as doing whatever I can for work over there. Because I have the rent from my house here, I won't need to earn much, hence don't need to get into another office job. I could also, at least for a few years, contract back in the UK for three months a year and take another £10k/year back to Poland.

The problems are, IT would be very difficult to get back into. If I came back to the UK after a couple of years, I think I would struggle to get back into the field. However, since I would still have my house here at least I wouldn't have to pay a mortgage, so I could settle for a lower wage than I have now. the other problem is pensions. My state pension (and currently measly copmany pension), on top of rental income should leave me relatively well off (30 years is a long time, but I expect that £'s will still go relatively far in Poland then, even if the difference is much smaller. It will still be a cheaper place to live).

When my kids grow up, they will still have an easy way to get back to the UK (via my house there, although I realise that this will reduce my income for a time, but I am considering putting a 20% or 30% deposit down on a house in the UK before I leave in the hope that I could still have two houses in the UK by the time I retire).

The problem will be that I may want to take advantage of the UK health facilities, transport facilities, and general benefits for the elderly. I won't have a full UK pension, so it might be very expensive..

Sorry for the long rant, but if there is anyone still awake who has done something similar, do you have any comments?
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Postby scatmanwalks » Sun 5 Mar 2006 13:58 GMT

I moved to Poland from the UK in December 2004, to be with my wife who is Polish.

I too work in IT, and am same age (31). I'm now working in IT in poland, and have been since September 2005. It took a long time before I got a job in IT, and it was through a friend of my wife to make initial contact with this company some two years earlier. Of course, when I arrived, I notified them that I'm now here full time, and would look forward to hear from them with regards to a job.

I know Nowy Targ, a two hour bus ride south of Krakow. If you wanted to make sure IT wasn't a problem, maybe you could find work in IT within Krakow. It shouldn't be too much of a problem to find work I would have thought. For me, I live in South East Poland, and is much more difficult because there aren't many companies to choose from.

If you're worrying about getting back into IT, then really you need to try and stay in it, but how easy it is to find a job, can be difficult for one, and easy for another. Teaching English is good, and I nearly took this route, and took a TEFL course just in case the IT job didn't work out. I can of course, still do this if I wanted to at some stage.

Hope that helps a bit. I just came across your post trying to find info on insuring my UK car in Poland :D
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Postby UKer » Sun 5 Mar 2006 22:37 GMT

Thanks for the reply. Would love to know why you moved, what you found good, and what sucked about it, whether you speak Polish (now or then), and you general thoughts on doing it really. Do you have kids (that could open a whole raft of questions!!).

You can PM me if you like!

Cheers
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Postby scatmanwalks » Mon 6 Mar 2006 17:29 GMT

Moved to Poland because of my wife. She didn't really want to leave her family and come to the UK and live, so I decided to move there.

The worst thing was having to wait to sort myself out with a job. And in the process, being at home all day every day, compared to before I moved to working in London 12 hours a day! First, we had no internet here in our village other than dialup, so couldn't even get online and do much. But after a few months we got broadband, so it was more or less OK then, but still boring. I didn't know anyone, other than my wife and some of her friends of whom we saw rarely anyway. It was disappointing and I thought there was no chance of getting a job. That was when I decided to do the self-study TEFL course to teach English if things didn't work out. And then around July time, I had a meeting with the guy who is now my Manager, and I started working in September (after spending one month in UK for holiday :D )

No kids as of yet, we're working on our first which is due in about two months! Sleepless nights ahoy! :shock:

The good thing now is that I have the job I wanted, which is in IT. Means I'm not out of the game, and unable to get back into it in the future, than if I was teaching, or something else. Life is really relaxed, and I like it. Much different to working in London, but then that was enjoyable too. The main thing now is that I have quite a lot more time for myself, family and things like that.

I speak a little polish, not a great deal, but can get by with the normal sort of touristy stuff, directions, how much is this, and all that.
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Postby UKer » Mon 13 Mar 2006 10:06 GMT

Thanks for that. Good to know!
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Postby scatmanwalks » Mon 24 Apr 2006 12:04 GMT

One other thing I thought of. When you decide to come here, before you can work you need to arrange a PESEL number. This is usually assigned when you are born (if Polish nationality).

But, you need residency first. You can arrange temporary residency by going to the local council for the town/village you live in. Or, to arrange permanent residency which lasts for 5 years. This requires a photo card. Either is fine for arranging the PESEL. Permanent residency costs about 30zl (£5) to prepare the card, and takes about a month.

To work, you need the equivalent of the UK tax code. So, you'd need to apply for a NIP. This is also done at your local council for the town/village.

After 5 years, I believe you can apply for citizenship, which means you don't have to worry about updating your permanent residency every 5 years.

Once you have residency and a PESEL, you'll be OK to open a bank account. I had permanent residency at this time, so unsure if you'll get a bank account with temporary residency or not. Maybe, but I'm unsure.
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Postby davieh » Mon 21 May 2007 18:48 GMT

Hi, there should be no problem you opening a bank account or sorting out your PESEL. I used to live in Poland back in 1991 - 1995. (It was a pretty wild country back in those days !) I spent this time teaching English. I worked in IT before then and luckily managed to get back into IT when I came back to the UK (due to the Year 2000 work at that time)

I'd recommend you try to sort yourself a job in IT over there if you can. The job market there (outside of Warsaw) is more difficult than in the UK and you won't earn anything like what you get in the UK.

Personally, I came back to the UK because I felt that it would get more difficult to find work teaching as I got older. Also, at that time, property was expensive relative to earnings and my (polish) wife and I didn't have any savings so we coudn't see a way of ever buying our own place. (No mortgages at that time)

I must say that I loved living over there, especially in the warmer months. It does get a bit grey there in the winter in years when there is no snow, but in the mountains there is normally plenty and skiing is great.

If you own your own home in the UK and you are in a position to rent it out, I'm sure you'd near enough have enough money for everyday life.

It would probably be a shrewd move to buy yourselves a house as opposed to a flat over there. I believe that foreigners are not allowed to buy houses with land for a few years yet, but if you have a polish wife, then she could buy a house. I'm sure you'll better enjoy living in a house than in a concrete flat. (I know this from experience !) and you may make more money on it than another property over here (in any case it will certainly be cheaper over there.)

As regards to learning polish, it took me three years to learn. I am more or less fluent, but I make lots of grammatical errors.

Good luck. :)
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Postby scatmanwalks » Wed 23 May 2007 06:49 GMT

I'm currently in the process of building my house. I suppose if your married and living over here I don't expect they will object too much to a UK person building a house, because you're doing it for your family.

If you went over there alone, and wanted to build one for holiday purposes, or whatever, then it would probably be more difficult.

As it is, effectively, I've decided to keep out of it in case it does complicate things, so it's as if my wife is building the house on her land. I can always add my name to it later if needed.

I too used to work in IT in the UK, and am doing the same in Poland, with my limited Polish language ;)
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