It is currently Mon 14 Oct 2019 08:59 GMT
Change font size

    Latest Message from British Expat:

  • Five alliterative questions – Quick Quiz
    Here are five questions with a common theme - the key word in all of them begins "b*mb". Why not bimble through them and see how many you can get right?

West Coast

Gaelic Speakers

This is the forum for all your West Coast quips and questions.

Gaelic Speakers

Postby JFlowers » Mon 29 Nov 2004 11:55 GMT

I am a US citizen currently living in Portland, Oregon. I hope to move to Scotland sometime next year to attend school. I would love to hear from a Gaelic speaker who would be interested in having a short phone conversation once or twice a week. I am currently taking an on-line class and am in need of more conversation and vocal interaction.
Moran taing!!
J
Last edited by JFlowers on Mon 29 Nov 2004 12:42 GMT, edited 1 time in total.
Posted by:
JFlowers
New Member
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon 29 Nov 2004 11:51 GMT

Postby Kay » Mon 29 Nov 2004 12:06 GMT

Hi J

Welcome to BE. I'm curious to know why you've chosen to go to Scotland for your education. I'm Scottish and I believe I had a good education there, so much so, I've chosen a Scottish uni for the Masters degree I'm currently doing (by distance learning).

Where are you planning to live? The reason I ask is that there aren't all that many communities who speak Gaelic unless you're in the west coast Highlands and Islands - and I'm not aware of any major educational establishments in these areas.

There are loads of Scots on here, but most of us speak the east coast dialect/language which is called Doric. We all speak English, though.

If you can give some more details, we'll be able to help you better.

Good luck with your plans!

Kay :D
Not Delia - Foodie blog with lots of reviews and recipes.
Posted by:
User avatar
Kay
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15338
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 13:06 GMT
Location: Kent for a couple of years

Gaelic speakers

Postby JFlowers » Mon 29 Nov 2004 12:42 GMT

Kay-
I hope to attend Sabhal Mor Ostaig, an Teanga. I am taking An Cursa Inntrigeadh, but I have fallen behind due to a series of unfortunate events, and I would reeally love to get caught up.
I chose Sabhal Mor because I love Gaelic, Scotland and especially the people found there. I'd eventually like to work in Gaelic publishing or broadcasting.
I just visited Sabhal Mor and Glasgow, and had the time of my life. I can't wait to get back.
So, a bheil Gaidhlig agaibh? Or do you know anyone who does?? Anyone in the continental US would be fine, as I can call long distance no problem.
Why are you in Thailand? Any plans to return to Alba anytime soon? Which university are you studying with?
Regards,
J
Posted by:
JFlowers
New Member
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon 29 Nov 2004 11:51 GMT

Postby Kay » Mon 29 Nov 2004 15:39 GMT

Hi again, J

Thanks for the info, and I wish you the best of luck. I don't know of any Gaelic speakers on here, but it would be nice if there were some. I'll post on the Chinwags board on our other forum and ask. As I said, most of the Jocks around here are Doric speakers.

I'm sorry I didn't understand most of your reply - I'm fairly clueless when it comes to Gaelic. But keep at it! I've spent some time in the west of Scotland and the people are great, and they'll help you. I did know some people at the college you're planning to go to, but that was a long, long time ago. I went on an outing with them and it was really good fun.

I'm with RGU (Aberdeen) and in the final stage of my MSc in e-business. Why am I in Thailand? Hey, that story is too long. And no, I have have no plans to return to the old, cold, and expensive country. I like it here.

All the best,

Kay

(and I'll get back to you if I discover any Gaelic speakers)
Not Delia - Foodie blog with lots of reviews and recipes.
Posted by:
User avatar
Kay
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15338
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 13:06 GMT
Location: Kent for a couple of years

Postby Dave » Mon 29 Nov 2004 15:53 GMT

A J, a chara,

I wish I could help. Unfortunately, the very little Gaeilge I learnt was over ten years ago, and was (as you'll tell from the spelling) of the Irish persuasion, which probably wouldn't help a huge amount. (I've got a Teach Yourself book and tape and may have a look at that again some time, although learning Thai is probably a bigger priority right now...)

All the same, good luck to you. Lovely language, lovely people... I almost wish I was there on the course instead of you!
British Newspapers Online - your handy guide to the UK's national, regional and local press!
ErgoGuides - Great travel and business eBooks from British Expat!
Posted by:
User avatar
Dave
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7265
Joined: Tue 21 Jan 2003 15:04 GMT
Location: Currently UK

old & cold...

Postby JFlowers » Mon 29 Nov 2004 20:00 GMT

Yes, but so incredibly beautiful. Expensive, too, but I'd give anything to call it home. I've never been to your part of the world, but I hear it's lovely.
Enjoy your life in Thailand!
Le durachd,
J
Posted by:
JFlowers
New Member
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon 29 Nov 2004 11:51 GMT

Did you find your Gaelic speaker?

Postby IS Tucson » Sun 17 Apr 2005 20:15 GMT

I don't want to poste a link in case I'm accused of spamming, but here in Tucson we have a number of Gaelic teachers (Irish / Scots) and also Welsh, and I've heard of Belgian and Spanish Gaelic groups although have no direct knowledge.
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
IS Tucson
Free member
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun 17 Apr 2005 20:06 GMT
Location: Tucson, AZ, USA


Return to West Coast



cron