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Misheard lyrics ("Mondegreens")

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Misheard lyrics ("Mondegreens")

Postby Dave » Tue 23 May 2006 17:53 GMT

JaJ made a side comment on the House of Fun, asking if people had any favourite "mondegreens". (See below* for explanation.)

The classic is probably Jimi Hendrix in "Purple Haze":

'Scuse me while I kiss this guy [instead of "kiss the sky"]


I think one of my favourites was in "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow":

Can I believe the magic of your size


which sounds quite smutty to a teenager - much more interesting than "your sighs", which is what I'm sure Carole King intended.

Anyone got any others?



*Mondegreens are misheard lyrics. The term originates with author Sylvia Wright, who misheard some lines in "The Bonnie Earl of Murray":

They have slain the Earl of Murray,
And they layd him on the green


which, for several years, she thought were:

They have slain the Earl of Murray,
And the Lady Mondegreen
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Postby CustomStrat » Wed 24 May 2006 03:19 GMT

How about Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Bad Moon Rising?"

There's a bathroom on the right...?

Or...There's a bad moon on the rise...?
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Postby justajester » Wed 24 May 2006 12:07 GMT

For many years that song of Elvis, Suspicious minds, confused me. I wondered what he meant when he sang 'we'll call it a dreb'...couldn't for the life of me figure out what a dreb was. Of course, the real words were "We're caught in a trap" :oops:

As I have a minor hearing problem, I often mishear lyrics, only to find out when someone sings the 'right' words, or I happen to see the song in print.
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Postby Dave » Fri 26 May 2006 12:26 GMT

Two for the price of one in memory of Desmond Dekker, who sadly died yesterday:

Ohh, ohh, me ears are alight ("The Israelites")


and from the same song:

Me wife and me children get up and leave me
Darling she said I was yards too greasy ("...yours to receive")
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Postby ruggie » Sun 24 Sep 2006 13:24 GMT

.... mairsy dotes and liddle lambsy divy...
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Postby Purley » Tue 26 Sep 2006 17:07 GMT

Yes, we had that on a 78. I always thought it was:

mairsey dotes and lamsey dotes and little lamsey divey!

It never occurred to me that it was supposed to make any sense!
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Postby Savannah_Alan » Wed 27 Sep 2006 02:23 GMT

How about "reverse" mondegreens?

Of course, I can't remember many of them now (have to be given the song title first), but my father (who was a professional pianist) always used to have cute little alternative titles for songs like "The Refrigerator Song" (Freeze a jolly good fellow).
My all time favourite though was "The Kodak song" (Some day my prints will come). :crackup:

Ah, I miss the British sense of humour...

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Postby ruggie » Sat 30 Sep 2006 08:54 GMT

My earlier edit failed. Should be 'mairsey dotes and dozey dotes and liddle lambsey divey', I think. I like the alternative titles idea.

How about 'Judy in disguise' (with diamonds)?
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Postby Kay » Sat 30 Sep 2006 11:31 GMT

Great thread, folks!

I always thought that Elton John's Goodbye Yellow Brick Road had a line "You can't have me as your pen-pal..." until Dave told me last week it's: "You can't lock me in your penthouse..." :lol:

And one of REM's songs - can't remember the title - I thought had "Each of us was troubled by a horrible ass..." (The mind boggles!) But again I was corrected that it was in fact: "Egypt was troubled by a horrible asp..."
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Postby Dave » Sat 30 Sep 2006 15:01 GMT

ruggie wrote:How about 'Judy in disguise' (with diamonds)?


With glasses, shurely... :lol:
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