It is currently Thu 28 May 2020 03:18 GMT
Change font size

Chinwags

Message in a bottle

Talk about the weather, make new friends, comment on anything, pop in to say "hello". [Please DO NOT post country-specific questions here - they belong on the relevant country forum in the In-Country Experts Forum.]

Message in a bottle

Postby Kay » Thu 30 Aug 2012 10:36 GMT

Here's a BBC story about a message in a bottle which was found 98 years after it was sent.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-n ... d-19422354

I've often thought it might be quite fun to send a message in a bottle but never had any belief that it would ever result in anything.

Have you ever done it? Did you ever hear from someone who found it?
Not Delia - Foodie blog with lots of reviews and recipes.
Posted by:
User avatar
Kay
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15338
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 13:06 GMT
Location: Kent for a couple of years

Postby Graeme » Thu 30 Aug 2012 14:57 GMT

I liked his comment that it felt like winning the lottery twice, I have a feeling winning the lottery would be somewhat more lucrative and have a longer lasting impact.
Neat story though, hard to imagine a bottle could last out in the sea for so long.
Hungry for magazines from Britain? Visit the main web site at http://www.britishexpat.com and satisfy that craving!
Posted by:
User avatar
Graeme
Site Admin
 
Posts: 2129
Joined: Wed 1 Oct 2003 02:14 GMT
Location: British Columbia, Canada.

Postby Dave » Thu 30 Aug 2012 15:58 GMT

I dunno, Graeme - some people take their pleasure in strange ways. :lol:

I skim-read the article and was amazed that the crew of the same vessel should have beaten the previous record. But, as Kay says, the coincidence is considerably smaller than it might otherwise have been because the bottle was part of a batch released for scientific purposes.

I wonder how much the sixpence would be worth these days? Obviously 6d = 2½p, and then of course there's inflation since 1914, which would be considerable. Going by Ulysses, which I've just been re-reading, Bloom was able to buy a glass of Burgundy and a Gorgonzola sandwich for sevenpence, anyway. So that would make sixpence worth about - what, at least four quid?

But what I really mean is: how much would a 1914 silver sixpence be worth if you were to buy one from a dealer? I'm off to try and find out.
British Newspapers Online - your handy guide to the UK's national, regional and local press!
ErgoGuides - Great travel and business eBooks from British Expat!
Posted by:
User avatar
Dave
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7267
Joined: Tue 21 Jan 2003 15:04 GMT
Location: Currently UK

Postby Dave » Thu 30 Aug 2012 16:21 GMT

OK, I have an answer.

Basically, if it were a mint-condition coin you'd be looking at anything between £25 and £40. A coin with a barely noticeable amount of superficial wear would be worth about £10; a coin with somewhat more wear but still with most details clear would be worth about £2; and anything with more wear than that would probably not be of much interest to a serious collector.

So unless the hydrographers had sealed the sixpences into their bottles (or put their stock of sixpences into an environmentally controlled vault) you'd probably be better off taking the inflation-adjusted payment.

(When I was a kid we had a fairly big bag of pre-decimal coppers. The oldest identifiable one, I think, was an 1879 penny. It was virtually smooth! Not much collectible value there.)
British Newspapers Online - your handy guide to the UK's national, regional and local press!
ErgoGuides - Great travel and business eBooks from British Expat!
Posted by:
User avatar
Dave
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7267
Joined: Tue 21 Jan 2003 15:04 GMT
Location: Currently UK


Return to Chinwags



cron