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Where is everyone?

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Where is everyone?

Postby Purley » Mon 14 Oct 2013 15:13 GMT

I was here many years ago. I got the t-shirt too but it's worn out and long gone.

I looked on the Canada board because I thought I might be slightly helpful there. I can't find any recent posts. There are thousands of registered users on the board, but I don't know where to look for anything that says "October 2013".

Maybe I am not looking in the right place so I might need some help finding current posts where I could add my words of supposed wisdom!
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Postby Graeme » Mon 14 Oct 2013 15:36 GMT

I think there was a change for the Canada board when the government changed the immigration laws a couple of years ago, it has made it much clearer who can get immigration and the process is simpler, ergo fewer questions. However, the government has tweaked those rules more than once and oddly we never got many questions about that. I see the 'professional' immigration side of things is going back on the fast track again very soon, so maybe there will be more questions then? From this end of the country the vast majority of immigrants are from China and Korea, I guess they don't ask questions on this forum, maybe there's a Chinese equivalent somewhere?
Nice to see you back.
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Postby Graeme » Mon 14 Oct 2013 15:43 GMT

I see things are gradually changing again in the lower mainland and that 600 Irish workers are being imported. I don't know how to link to this story as it's in an online newspaper so I included it here for you to read, note the mention of the expansion of the skilled workers program and the huge shortages expected here over the next few years. The government of BC is planning a huge expansion into liquefied natural gas and thin they will produce thousands of jobs from it, problem is we don't have the workers for those jobs:

"The current shortage of skilled tradespeople in Western Canada is so dire that the B.C. Construction Association is returning to Ireland this month to hire 600 people, said the group's vice-president.
In fact, even if one-in-five students graduating from high school in B.C. during the next three years were to pursue a trade, there still wouldn't be enough workers to fill shortages in the province's construction industry, said Abigail Fulton.
Not everybody agrees with the recruitment drive, especially the province's labour leaders who argue employers can find skilled, unionized Canadian workers to fill immediate, vacant positions.
Yet, a consensus is developing that there will be a shortage of skilled workers in the coming decade, as proponents of the liquefied natural-gas industry, hydro-electric projects and oil and gas pipelines push their proposals forward.
"There's lots of evidence to suggest we're not doing enough to train construction workers in skilled trades in British Columbia, and if even half these projects come through we're going to have a crisis unless we start now to deal with the problem," said Jim Sinclair, president of the BC Federation of Labour.
The provincial government's own statistics indicate there will be more than one-million job openings over the next decade, and more than 153,000 of those will be among trades, transport, equipment operators and related occupations. Retirements will be responsible for two-thirds of the vacancies, and new economic growth will be behind the remaining third, states the British Columbia Labour Market Outlook 2010-2020.
In the B.C. construction industry, about 30,500 jobs were expected to go unfilled by 2012, according to the association's own statistics.
To address some of the problem, the association is organizing and hosting the Western Canada Construction Job Expo Oct. 31 in Belfast and Nov. 2 in Dublin, where it will represent about 30 employers, half of them from BC, said Fulton.
Wanted will be workers in more than 50 construction trades, from bricklayers to framing carpenters, power-line technicians to welders. Even architects and structural engineers are in demand.
Two employees of the provincial nominee program, which allows the BC government to nominate individuals to immigrate to Canada, will attend, said Skills Training Minister Shirley Bond in an email statement.
"Our staff will be providing seminars on working, living and investing in BC, and will provide important on-the-ground expertise and advice on immigration matters," she said.
Bond said the program is critical in helping BC address the impending labour shortage and offers an accelerated pathway to permanent residence for eligible skilled foreign workers, international graduates, and qualified entrepreneurs and their family members who intend to settle in BC.
The trip won't be the first for the association, which made its first visit in March 2012.
Fulton said the association learned the Irish apprenticeship system was one of the best, and skilled trades people would be able to transition to Canada and earn their Red Seal, an interprovincial standard of excellence in the trades.
She said the association also learned there was an abundance of trades' people.
The Irish economy crashed in 2008 and still hasn't recovered, and last year's job expo drew 20,000 people, she said, adding unemployed tradespeople lined up outside the job fair, down the street and around the corner for as long as two days.
"Listen, these folk are over there, we know their apprenticeship system is excellent, they're looking for work and we need workers," she said.
But the province's labour leaders aren't as excited as Fulton about the expo.
"There are British Columbians and Canadians that probably could do those jobs," said Tom Sigurdson, executive director of the British Columbia and Yukon Territory Building and Construction Trades Council.
He said skilled, unionized workers are available, but some companies don't want to hire union workers, so they turn to other sources.
Sinclair also questioned why businesses are turning to the Irish who he alleged are ending up as indentured workers, especially if they are coming to Canada on temporary visas.
"A guy ... who owns a business, a construction business, said to me, 'I like Irish workers because they have to work for me for two years and can't quit.' I mean and I've had that said to me by other employers, too," said Sinclair."
Interesting stuff.
Graeme :D
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Postby Purley » Mon 14 Oct 2013 21:52 GMT

It's the same thing here. The workplace is booming at the moment. I am hoping it will continue to boom until my younger son gets another job. The place he worked for for nearly 13 years is closing their Regina operation. He got a good severance package and he is very frugal - he says he has enough money put away so he doesn't have to work for a year - and that is aside from his severance which he had transferred to an RRSP to save tax.

He wants to get a plumbing apprenticeship. He deserves a good job. He is a hard worker, a very honest person and he delayed his own career years ago to raise his daughter on his own while her mother did as she pleased!!

On the immigrant front, we have loads of Phillipinos, East Indians, Asians from I don't know where -- five years ago you would find it strange to see someone in Regina walking around with one of those scarves over their heads -- now it seems half the Walmart staff have them!

The only problem with the Phillipinos from my point of view is - yes they speak English. But the English they speak often comes with such a heavy accent that they might as well be speaking a foreign language. I try three or four times and then I give up. Still, the fast food restaurants would probably be closed without them!


How are things with you - still in the interior somewhere?
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Postby JJ » Mon 14 Oct 2013 22:16 GMT

Gah! I spent an hour on the phone to Barclays Bank today and it was a struggle because (apart from their complete failure to solve my problem and complete success in constantly insulting my intelligence, for which a formal complaint was filed) their English simply isn't English as she is spoke.

Hint to anyone I ever speak to: If you ask me to help you with my date of birth I shall explain that it's the date on which I was born, and if you ask me to help you with my mother's maiden name I shall explain that it was her surname before she married my father, and if you wish to do business with me you must bloody well learn to speak proper English.
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Postby Graeme » Tue 15 Oct 2013 04:27 GMT

I agree JJ, so often I end up speaking to someone in Pakistan or Bangladesh and I know they try their best but I have a devil of a job understanding them.
Yes Liz, I'm still in the Interior of BC, still in golden handcuffs it seems.
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Postby Purley » Wed 16 Oct 2013 15:34 GMT

I totally agree with you. It's not being racist. In Regina, you go to the Dairy Queen and they are all Phillipino and they speak English just like, shall we say, Canadians. You go to Tim Hortons and you have no idea what they are saying. I had a friend visiting last week from Kelowna. She asked me how long all these "people" had been here -- in the last five years I think. We went to Wendy's for a salad. My friend said "Do you have seniors' prices" - I could understand her. The woman behind the counter thought she asked for a drink of water!! How the heck do you get "water" from "seniors prices?"

It gets very frustrating. Burger King a few years ago with my granddaughter. "manos peekoo" pardon??? 'manos peekoo" my granddaughter says "What is she saying?" "No idea" - in the end we got it "Minus pickles". Excuse me - Canadians say "Do you want pickles?" But if I didn't want flipping pickles I would have said "no pickles". You don't go through a whole list - manos peekoo, manos leetoos etc. etc.

In the end it makes you rude!
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Postby gozomark » Fri 29 Nov 2013 18:16 GMT

Purley wrote:The only problem with the Phillipinos from my point of view is - yes they speak English. But the English they speak often comes with such a heavy accent that they might as well be speaking a foreign language.


I have the same problem with Canadians :-) as for the Scots, well...
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