It is currently Thu 28 May 2020 05:38 GMT
Change font size

Chinwags

Prisoners?

Talk about the weather, make new friends, comment on anything, pop in to say "hello". [Please DO NOT post country-specific questions here - they belong on the relevant country forum in the In-Country Experts Forum.]

Prisoners?

Postby CustomStrat » Fri 25 Jul 2003 21:48 GMT

How many of us recall the TV series “The Prisoner” with Patrick McGoohan as a “civil servant” who resigns his job and is taken “prisoner” in The Village where he is given the designation of #6 and where #2 is continually trying to determine why he resigned while he seeks to discover the identity of #1?

Many who saw the series, when it came on back in the late 60’s, thought it was weird. Was it action, adventure, sci-fi, what did it all mean…?

To me it’s message was very clear. The Prisoner is about the concept of the individual, expressing the right to be themselves and free of the restraints of society’s insistence on conformity. We are all, six of one, half dozen of the other; the wardens of our own prisons by accepting our imprisonment through our conformity. This is what he comes to realise when ultimately unmasking #1 to reveal himself. The ever changing #2 represents those we elect to public office and to whom we abdicate responsibility for running the game. He doesn't just quit his job (a prison if there was ever one), he quits the game; he's not going on holiday in the opening sequence; he's not packing brochures, he's packing photos of his destination; some tropical island where he won't have to answer to anyone but himself. But, before he gets to that place
he has to have this "revelation" in the form of his "visit" to the Village. Before he can be truly free he must first see the prison that he's escaping from in microcosm.

I think, to many of us here, the adventure of expatriation is a reflection of our desire to escape the conformity of ordinary lives. Even if we trade one ordinary life for another are we not still enjoying a form of escape. Did we not leave home with the dream or hope of finding something better, more worthwhile, more fulfilling? Have we found it or are we still prisoners…?
I'm not afraid to die; I just don't want to be there when it happens - Woody Allen
Posted by:
CustomStrat
Supporter
 
Posts: 452
Joined: Mon 30 Jun 2003 04:56 GMT
Location: Arkansas; originally from Reading

Postby Kay » Fri 25 Jul 2003 22:21 GMT

Interesting.

I'm sorry but I'm not familiar with the series, although we can try to find it as it seems like it would be worth watching.

We had a discussion ages ago on this forum, which got buried so I've no idea where it is now, about different kinds of expats. There are those who up sticks and move to a new life elsewhere, there are nomads like Dave and me who spend a few years in a place and happily move on to the next, and there are those like Mike K-H who were brought up in a foreign land.

Although we do all have much in common, we're not a homogenous group at all. I have no idea what it's like to move to another country with the intention of making it a permanent new home. Yet, it seems to me - no doubt others will disagree - that it's those who have made the permanent move who seem to be more homesick and who think more about what they miss.

Actually, that's probably not entirely accurate. We have more postings like that from those in North America. The people in Europe seem to be more settled. And the nomads generally don't seem to suffer the same thing at all.

I haven't been back to the UK for a couple of years, despite having several opportunities to do so, and have no intention of going unless it's essential.

Back to your point about escaping - yes I probably did. I've found something better, more worthwhile, and more fulfilling. I'm not a prisoner, I'm just doing what I want to do. I like it.

I'm sure, though, that others are going to have entirely different views. I'm looking forward to reading them.

Kay
Not Delia - Foodie blog with lots of reviews and recipes.
Posted by:
User avatar
Kay
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15338
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 13:06 GMT
Location: Kent for a couple of years

Postby Squiffy » Sat 26 Jul 2003 07:16 GMT

I have the opposite problem.

Although born in the UK, my "home" is Canada, almost ALL my family is there and I was the first Habkirk to be born outside North America for 126 years!

It is strange to try and tell anyone ho wit feels to be an "expat" in what is essentially "your" country, but each time I go back it is harder to come away again. So I feel I can relate in some way to how other expat feel when "homesick". I love to travel, but never really get much chance too with a growing family etc.

My dream has always been to go "home" for good, but alas, when you marry someone with all their family here, it is very hard for them to make the move.

Sorry that does not really qualify in the strict sense of "expat" feelings, but to me, it does.

squiffs
Squiffy - Laugh for MS - : http://www.shof.msrcsites.co.uk/
Posted by:
Squiffy
Supporter
 
Posts: 3610
Joined: Wed 30 Apr 2003 17:07 GMT
Location: House of Fun

Postby Rich » Sat 26 Jul 2003 13:27 GMT

I'm sorry but I'm not familiar with the series, although we can try to find it as it seems like it would be worth watching.


My god! How did you manage that?! Despite the fact it was probably 25years old when i first saw it, i think it's fantastic series, can be interpreted in many different ways. Kay - if you can't find it on (or on satellite somewhere), let me know. Somewhere my parents have a DVD of it which I can probably post to you :D

As to the expat thing, I'm probably not old enough or a long term enough expat yet to really know where I stand. Although i've lived in a few different places, this is the longest i've been in one foreign place (10months ish), and i've always been travelling around so much, that I actually feel more at home when on ferries/night trains etc. than anywhere else!!

I have no intention (at this point) to ever live in Britain again (or even settling anywhere really), but I can see if I was married/had kids or in 10-15 years, I may want to move back and possibly settle down there. At the moment, I'm a wanderer, and perfectly happy with that, but I don't have any specific ties to any place - no owned house/serious partner/no kids/never been a close family/never even owned a car - whilst all my friends are scattered across the world anyway, so it's relatively easy for me to up sticks and go aomewhere else.

I go back to Britain quite regularly for work, and generally enjoy it. However, although it feels sort of homey, it's probably because i'm travelling with non-Brits, and I always feel more British when i'm traveling with non Brits, or at least native English speakers. It always feels really strange going back, and although i like it for a bit, after a few days/a week, I can't wait to leave again.

Also, because I live in a small town, the British things I miss are harder to get. If I lived in a big city which had a British pub/an expat community/ability to buy proper bacon etc., then I probably would be less inclined to go back o Britain itself.
There's loads more to see and do on British Expat— why not check out our home page?
Posted by:
Rich
Supporter
 
Posts: 1085
Joined: Tue 15 Apr 2003 14:10 GMT
Location: Sweden based, but travel alot so your guess is as good as mine, answers on a postcard to the HOF...

Postby chabrenas » Sat 26 Jul 2003 19:27 GMT

The Prisoner was peak time TV when I watched it, aged about 17. I did see that ithad been issued on DVD - and I thought it was on satellite TV somewhere recently. I presume it is still the original black & white film, not a remake? can anyone remeber where it was made - Dawlish, I think.

Also, because I live in a small town, the British things I miss are harder to get. If I lived in a big city which had a British pub/an expat community/ability to buy proper bacon etc., then I probably would be less inclined to go back o Britain itself.


Doesn't work that way with me at all. When I first worked in Paris, UK pubs were selling English keg beers (particularly Watneys Red Barrel), and a lot of expats would spend their evenings at expensive bars that sold the stuff, which, of course, were full of Brits.

I used to eat in our local suburban restaurant, where they allowed the dog to come in and sit under the table and a talented blind man played the piano.

When in France, I did my best to live among the French. When I went back to the UK, I saw it with different eyes - appreciated some things more, and other things less.
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
chabrenas
Free member
 
Posts: 762
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 17:41 GMT
Location: France

Postby Purley » Sat 26 Jul 2003 23:03 GMT

I remember that show. I think it was on ITV - which was frowned upon by my Dad who thought that everything on ITV was absolute rubbish and very low class! He must have been out when we watched it. I think I enjoyed it but I don't think I really understood what was going on. Perhaps I only watched it occasionally!

I think I would feel like Mike, if I ived in France I would want to live amongst the French. I can't imagine wanting to live in France and hanging out with all the Brits.

However, that being said, my best friend is English and I only met her becuase years and years ago I went back to England for a holiday and came back (as usual) going through withdrawal and wanting to move back. My office manager at the time said "I am going to give you the phone number of a friend of mine who did just that." I phoned her and we have been friends ever since. But I don't necessarily hunt out Brits to hang around with. When I meet one we always have things to chat about!
There's loads more to see and do on British Expat— why not check out our home page?
Posted by:
Purley
Supporter
 
Posts: 1070
Joined: Mon 24 Mar 2003 14:07 GMT
Location: Regina

Postby Terry » Sun 27 Jul 2003 09:49 GMT

It was filmed in Port Merion (sp?) in Wales the village built by that well known nutter whose name I can't remember.

This is an interesting thread but far too profound for me and I doubt if I will dip my toes in here again! I, to be honest, am a economic (em)migrant. If it hadn't been for work I doubt I would have chosen to live here in Germany, although now I'm here I enjoy it.

Work has taken me to a few places some where the culture has been totally different eg Japan, but like Chabrenas I always try to immerse myself rather than look for the expat haunts. This is a bit difficult as I am a sport junkie and this means that I must spend some time in the Irish bars of the world.

As an aside, I'm writing this at home and I'm really struggling with an english keyboard. Does anybody else have this problem?

Also I really struggle with my english now both written and oral, if I'm in a conversation with a english speaking person I can't avoid using a liberal sprinkling of Deutsch as it springs more readily to mind. Is this something you recognise auch?
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
Terry
Free member
 
Posts: 204
Joined: Thu 22 May 2003 09:11 GMT
Location: Köln Germany

Postby Rich » Sun 27 Jul 2003 12:10 GMT

As an aside, I'm writing this at home and I'm really struggling with an english keyboard. Does anybody else have this problem?


I hate that. I have Swedish, Danish, German and English keyboards and whichever one I use, I can never find the symbols etc. that move around etc.

I presume it is still the original black & white film, not a remake?


It is in colour, but is the original Patrick McGoohan version.
There's loads more to see and do on British Expat— why not check out our home page?
Posted by:
Rich
Supporter
 
Posts: 1085
Joined: Tue 15 Apr 2003 14:10 GMT
Location: Sweden based, but travel alot so your guess is as good as mine, answers on a postcard to the HOF...

Postby Kay » Sun 27 Jul 2003 12:30 GMT

I have an American keyboard but configured to British settings. I've got used to it now as long as I don't look at the keys too much - difficult as, unlike Dave, I can't touch-type.

Going back to The Prisoner, I'm definitely keen to watch it now, even though CustomStrat gave away the plot in his first posting. :shock: I expect he thought that everyone had already seen it. But some of us live on a different planet you know. :D
Not Delia - Foodie blog with lots of reviews and recipes.
Posted by:
User avatar
Kay
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15338
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 13:06 GMT
Location: Kent for a couple of years

Postby Rich » Sun 27 Jul 2003 12:35 GMT

Hmm. somehow hit send there without meaning too.

I also try and live with the locals and their way of life and not spend time with other Expats (or British speaking ones anyway). I often actively try and avoid them. But that does'nt mean there aren't British things I crave.

Regardless of how long I live away from Britain, I'm always going to enjoy a good cuppa, which is physically impossible to get in many countries unless you import your own bags/go to a big city with British stores etc. I normally drink strong black coffee like everybody else in Scandin., but I do still like a cup of tea in the morning. I also like a pint of bitter. I'm happy with non-Heineken lager/Guinness, but I do like a bitter every now and again, and that as a rule means British/Irish pub. But not all the time - More as an occassional treat, and not often enough that you become regular enough and start getting to know all the other Brits.

The sports Junkie thing accounts for me to. Football is OK and I can watch that with the locals (so many Swedish players in Britain, and support of British teams is huge here - more so than of Swedish teams as a rule!) or in some cases on non-staellite tv at home. Swedes are sports nuts as a arule anyway, so I get to see all sorts of stuff. However, Barely anybody in Sweden has even heard of Rugby however, so If I want to watch (and with a WCup coming up, i'll want to see at least the odd match), I have to go to an Irish pub in Kobenhavn. Many Irish bars in Sweden don't even show it because the BBC charges distortionate rates for the privilage, and in even medium sized towns, it's not worth the cost. And i've given up on Cricket except for web casts.

Also I really struggle with my english now both written and oral, if I'm in a conversation with a english speaking person I can't avoid using a liberal sprinkling of Deutsch as it springs more readily to mind. Is this something you recognise auch?


Interesting - Quite allot of people seem to have that problem. I haven't yet, because 80-90% of my work is done in English anyway. However because of that, my Swedish is not very good. I can understand, but speaking/writting is poor. It doesn't help (again, small town) that if I go into many shops/banks/bars, the people recognise me and speak English to me, because that's what I had to do when I first got here. Everybody speaks good (better than mine in cases) English and enjoys it. They hear it all the time on radio/tv/books etc, but don't often get the chance to practice speaking and they try and take full advantage of it.

They won't even reply to my Swedish in allot of places, and even Swedish people who I often go in with, they speak English to, even if i'm not there. One bar here, a 40year old Swedish friend who has lived here his entire life is always spoken to in English, because first time we were there, we were speaking English, and this still happens even though I speak Swedish with him now

What has gone kaput is other, similar languages. My German and Dutch were both fairly good before I came here. Now with Swedish and some Danish in my head as well, I find it really hard to speak German. I can still understand OK (sometimes), but my speaking/writting comes out as a mixture of all 5 languages. They are all too similar for my head to be able to keep apart. I tend to fall back onto English instead now, which isn't good.

I'm going to stop warbling on now. :P
There's loads more to see and do on British Expat— why not check out our home page?
Posted by:
Rich
Supporter
 
Posts: 1085
Joined: Tue 15 Apr 2003 14:10 GMT
Location: Sweden based, but travel alot so your guess is as good as mine, answers on a postcard to the HOF...

Postby justajester » Sun 27 Jul 2003 17:00 GMT

(((((((((((((((Squiffmeister)))))))))))))))))

Come on over...the teapot is on :cry:
Amor animi arbitrio sumitur, non punitor
Posted by:
justajester
Supporter
 
Posts: 1685
Joined: Mon 5 May 2003 20:08 GMT
Location: eastern Canada

Postby Rich » Sun 27 Jul 2003 17:14 GMT

Going back to The Prisoner, I'm definitely keen to watch it now, even though CustomStrat gave away the plot in his first posting.


Not really. Basic plot I suppose, yes, but there's so much more to it than that.
There's loads more to see and do on British Expat— why not check out our home page?
Posted by:
Rich
Supporter
 
Posts: 1085
Joined: Tue 15 Apr 2003 14:10 GMT
Location: Sweden based, but travel alot so your guess is as good as mine, answers on a postcard to the HOF...

Postby chabrenas » Sun 27 Jul 2003 20:56 GMT

Portmerion. Yes, it all comes back to me now....

As for my remembering it as a B&W series, that's because none of my friends' parents were wealthy or ostentatious enough to buy or hire colour TV sets in 1957 or whenever it was. We didn't have a TV at all until several years later.
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
chabrenas
Free member
 
Posts: 762
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 17:41 GMT
Location: France

Postby Kay » Mon 28 Jul 2003 02:30 GMT

none of my friends' parents were wealthy or ostentatious enough to buy or hire colour TV sets in 1957 or whenever it was.


LOL! One of our neighbours had coloured cellophane over their screen. I was very impressed and told everyone that they had colour TV. :roll: (early 1960s)
Not Delia - Foodie blog with lots of reviews and recipes.
Posted by:
User avatar
Kay
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15338
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 13:06 GMT
Location: Kent for a couple of years

Postby Squiffy » Mon 28 Jul 2003 08:38 GMT

nora wrote:(((((((((((((((Squiffmeister)))))))))))))))))

Come on over...the teapot is on :cry:


Thanks Nora, will be there about 3.30! :lol:
Squiffy - Laugh for MS - : http://www.shof.msrcsites.co.uk/
Posted by:
Squiffy
Supporter
 
Posts: 3610
Joined: Wed 30 Apr 2003 17:07 GMT
Location: House of Fun


Return to Chinwags



cron