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Talkin' 'bout my generation...

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Talkin' 'bout my generation...

Postby pmforster » Sun 25 May 2003 23:57 GMT

My sister in Cramlington New Town just sent me this. I thought some of us might like it:

According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids
in the 50's, 60's, 70's and 80's shouldn't have survived.

Our baby cots were covered with brightly coloured lead-based paint which was promptly chewed and licked.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, or latches on doors or
cabinets and it was fine to play with pans.

When we rode our bikes, we wore no helmets, just flip flops and fluorescent 'clackers' on our wheels.

We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle - tasted the same.

We ate dripping sandwiches, bread and butter pudding and drank fizzy pop
with sugar in it, but we were never overweight because we were always
outside playing.

We shared one drink with four friends, from one bottle or can and no one
actually died from this.

We would spend hours building go-carts out of scraps and then went top speed down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into stinging nettles a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back before it got dark. No one was able to reach us all day and noone minded.

We did not have Playstations or X-Boxes, no video games at all. No 99
channels on TV, no videotape movies, no surround sound, no mobile phones, no personal computers, no Internet chat rooms. We had friends - we went outside and found them.

We played elastics and street rounders, and sometimes that ball really hurt.

We fell out of trees, got cut and broke bones and teeth, and there were no
lawsuits. They were accidents. We learnt not to do the same thing again.
We had fights, punched each other hard and got black and blue - we learned to get over it.

We walked to friend's homes.
We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and ate live stuff, and
although we were told it would happen, we did not have very many eyes out, nor did the live stuff live inside us forever.

We rode bikes in packs of 7 and wore our coats by only the hood.


Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected. The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke a law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law. Imagine that!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers and problem
solvers and inventors, ever. The past 50 years have been an explosion of
innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure, success and
responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all.

And you're one of them. Congratulations!
Please pass this on to others who have had the luck to grow up as real kids, before lawyers and government regulated our lives, for our own good.

(If you aren't old enough, thought you might like to read about us).
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Postby H-D » Mon 26 May 2003 00:10 GMT

Brilliant Peter... I can picture myself in every one of those scenarios.
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Postby chabrenas » Mon 26 May 2003 05:09 GMT

Hear! Hear! I'll bet we all have a few tales to tell....
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Postby Kay » Mon 26 May 2003 06:26 GMT

Thanks, Peter

"...wore our coats only by the hood"

It's funny how you forget things and then a stray quote can bring it all back. Great stuff!

Kay
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Postby Squiffy » Mon 26 May 2003 07:02 GMT

Oh ho, the ruggies have escaped from their compound.....:lol:
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Postby Kay » Mon 26 May 2003 09:00 GMT

Hey, come on Squiffs

Given you have a teenage child, you must be part of this generation too.

Kay :D
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Postby Squiffy » Mon 26 May 2003 13:09 GMT

Kay wrote:Hey, come on Squiffs

Given you have a teenage child, you must be part of this generation too.

Kay :D


Opps, sussed :lol:

Though, she could be adopted................................. :?:
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Postby chabrenas » Mon 26 May 2003 17:45 GMT

Shall I encourage the ruggies to contribute to this thread, or open a parallel one for pre-1950 reminiscences? We do have pre WWII folks around....

I reckon the USA started this nonsense - I remember a friend, back in the 70's, being yelled at by a 'lifeguard' in a small motel swimming pool because two kids, both his, dived in from opposite sides, crossing underwater. Wonder what they'd have thought of the way I learned to swim:

- East African coral sand harbour, with sea urchins, stinging jellyfish and barracuda very occasionally hanging around.

- Swimming club and yacht club separated by a cliff with rocky ground below at low tide, but about 7 feet deep at high tide.

- Unaccompanied 8-year-old (me) is at the one-foot-down-between strokes stage, and decides to use this technique on a rising tide to go from one club to the other. About half way along the cliff, realises that he didn't touch bottom when he put his foot down....

.... and even after swapping quite a lot of my limited muscle tissue for fat as I fade away, I still sink in fresh water if I breathe out far enough.
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Postby Kay » Mon 26 May 2003 20:06 GMT

Mike, I agree this is a brilliant thread. Feel free to create a parallel discussion or whatever you think best. I expect Peter's post would amuse your Rug group as well as those on Expat Chat.

In any case, it's only a few days now till you're babysitting the whole forum. I trust your judgement and I'm sure Peter won't mind if you expand/copy/pinch his posting for another board.

It would be great to hear others' tales too.

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Postby H-D » Mon 26 May 2003 23:09 GMT

This definately belongs in the 'rug' and no doubt squiff will never understand, but the old 'soapboxes' Peter refers to where a wonderful pastime.

The length of string that was used for steering would always come undone of break as you were hurtling down (what seemed then) as the longest hill in the country!. Once the string had broken, you used to lay, head forward, steering with your hands, which usually ended up with fingers trapped between the main frame and the front axle cross member.

I can imagine how many perambulators (never mind squiff) lost there wheels prematurely.

I tried to resurect 'jigger racing' a couple of years ago. T'was to be a competition between the adults of a couple of local bars. Funny thing.... they all said 'Oh no, too dangerous'!!!... how we change with years!.

Any one remember 'Jaco' skates?. Where the dogs danglys of skates in my time. My old mum could'nt afford a pair for me and ended up with the woolworths jobbies which, I'm sure, had square bearings and always came undone on the adjuster nut/bolt!.... you'd finish up with a 'two piece' skate on each foot.... again not very good for direction control.
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Postby Squiffy » Tue 27 May 2003 07:34 GMT

Actually guys I was only joshing, I actually remember all that..... :lol:

My best go-kart was built like a tank! We actually could get 5 boys (or if we were lucky girls! :lol: ) in this thing, goodness knows how heavy it was, it was a devil to steer, we used our feet, stuck out th ebottom third of the front of the "cabin".

I had those two part skates as well, and yes, the blooming nuts always came off! How we ever survived without knee/elbow pads, helmets etc etc I'll never know :lol:

squiffs - you have to grow older but you never have to grow up!
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Postby chabrenas » Tue 27 May 2003 08:18 GMT

Shades of Calvin & Hobbes in their Radio Flyer. (For those who don't kow about this beast, it is a rather more reliable option than most of the planks-and-pram-wheels things we built in our youth. Sold as a hand-drawn trailer in various sizes, it has a feature that I would have expected to get it banned in its homw country: the towing handle is curved so that you can use it to steer with when you're sitting in the box. Since it's primary purpose is to be used as a trailer (optimistic parents hope the kids will go around picking up garden rubbish with it), it has no brakes....
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Postby H-D » Tue 27 May 2003 22:13 GMT

squiffmeister wrote:Actually guys I was only joshing, I actually remember all that.....

APPLICATION FOR 'RUG' FORUM


Signed.... Squiff.

:wink:
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Postby Squiffy » Tue 27 May 2003 22:15 GMT

H-D wrote:
squiffmeister wrote:Actually guys I was only joshing, I actually remember all that.....



APPLICATION FOR 'RUG' FORUM

I finally admit that I have a pair of tartan zip-up slippers and I am eligible for the 'Rug' forum.

Signed.... Squiff.

:wink:


Err, no, actually, I am way too young for the Rug, I thought you had to be 50 to get in there???

Long time before I reach THAT milestone! (Thanks God!:O) :lol:

Though I could always volunteer to pop in a couple of times a week and change the bedpans...... :twisted:
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Postby H-D » Tue 27 May 2003 22:34 GMT

[quote="squiffmeisterThough I could always volunteer to pop in a couple of times a week and change the bedpans...... :twisted:[/quote]

You'll be sorry..... it was vindaloo on tonights menu. :twisted:
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