It is currently Thu 28 May 2020 05:21 GMT
Change font size

Chinwags

Bugs

Talk about the weather, make new friends, comment on anything, pop in to say "hello". [Please DO NOT post country-specific questions here - they belong on the relevant country forum in the In-Country Experts Forum.]

Bugs

Postby Purley » Sun 3 Aug 2003 00:21 GMT

I suppose I shouldn't really start this thread seeing that probably there are loads of you who live with far worse bugs that we have here.

But I hate grasshoppers! They are really bad this year. When I stop on my son's driveway which is facing south and in the hot sun - scads of them leap about and hit my car!!! Yuck!!

What kind of critters (insects) do you have in your part of the world?
There's loads more to see and do on British Expat— why not check out our home page?
Posted by:
Purley
Supporter
 
Posts: 1070
Joined: Mon 24 Mar 2003 14:07 GMT
Location: Regina

Postby CustomStrat » Sun 3 Aug 2003 01:04 GMT

Well, down here in Arkansas it seems to be mostly mosquitos since rice is the primary cash crop of this predominently agricultural state. We also get a lot of wasps and, at this stage of the summer, dragonflies. Night driving is a bit of a mess; the windscreen, grill, headlamps and the fronts of the side mirrors get covered with bug splats...
I'm not afraid to die; I just don't want to be there when it happens - Woody Allen
Posted by:
CustomStrat
Supporter
 
Posts: 452
Joined: Mon 30 Jun 2003 04:56 GMT
Location: Arkansas; originally from Reading

Postby chabrenas » Sun 3 Aug 2003 05:46 GMT

Botswana seems to get plagues of different insects each year. A few years ago, up in the Okavango Delta region, I drove for 2Km through swarms of beautiful orange DRAGONFLIES!


Both the bugs that most people hate round here are about the size of my thumb. The first is a fat black & yellow beetle that attacks fruit trees, but the second is worse. We call it a corn cricket. It can slice through the stem of a young maize plant, and it's cannibalistic. When they are swarming, you see them squashed on the road, each being eaten by another, also squashed, being eaten by another, also squashed, being eaten.....


Indirectly, corn crickets can be a serious problem near the airport. Yellow-billed kites love them, so they appear in flocks at the end of the runway. Even one yellow-billed kite can give a big jet engine sever indigestion.
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
chabrenas
Free member
 
Posts: 762
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 17:41 GMT
Location: France

Bugs

Postby Pete Brown » Sun 3 Aug 2003 09:04 GMT

I live in Southern Spain,and in a ground floor apartment.
We get cockroaches,preying mantis,mosqitos,black beetles,and others which I dont know the name of.
GRASSHOPPERS,I wish they were the only ones to bother about!!!!
Pete :D
Posted by:
Pete Brown
New Member
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue 27 May 2003 10:57 GMT
Location: Calle Gondola Pueblo Italia,Apt Capri 1.1 Roquetas de Mar 04740 AQlmeria SPAIN

Postby Kay » Sun 3 Aug 2003 10:14 GMT

I'm not keen on grasshoppers either. I tried to eat one in Thailand and was nearly sick. :P

Funny you should mention bugs as today we've had a right carry on. First, the "office" was invaded by an army of ants. The problem first came to my attention when I felt my (bare) feet being bitten. Anyway, a bit of spray and a general clean-up has resolved the problem - till the next time. Meanwhile, we also had some computer bugs which led to me being offline for a few hours till Dave got it fixed.

We also have a lot of flies here in Delhi and I hate flies.

The biggest, and worst, pest around is monkeys, but we very rarely get them on our compound. The worst pest on-compound isn't a bug, it's a bird. We have loads of pariah kites flying around and if you are eating out in the open, they can swoop down and attempt to take your food. Some people have been left with gashed scalps. I was attacked once too but got off lightly. See this somewhat rambling article if you want to know more:
http://www.britishexpat.com/traveldelhi/delhi06.htm

Our next door neighbour had a plague of bandicoots, and there are loads of slugs and giant snails around in the monsoon season. Oh, yes, and we have mosquitoes too...

BTW, welcome to the forum, Pete! :D
Not Delia - Foodie blog with lots of reviews and recipes.
Posted by:
User avatar
Kay
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15338
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 13:06 GMT
Location: Kent for a couple of years

Postby HesitationKills » Sun 3 Aug 2003 12:55 GMT

Mainly mosquitoes here as well, luckily neither of us get bitten by them. My boss on the other hand attracts them like a magnet.
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
HesitationKills
Free member
 
Posts: 119
Joined: Mon 12 May 2003 17:56 GMT
Location: Almaty, Kazakhstan

Postby Mike » Sun 3 Aug 2003 14:59 GMT

'Tis the midgie season in Bonnie Scotland. I guess those of you plagued with mosquitoes reckon midgies are but a minor irritation. Believe me, it is not so.

I have sat in the car, windows tightly closed, on the shores of Loch Maree, watching tourists being driven slowly mad. Arms flailing like windmills, all self-control gone, and even diving into the Loch to escape.

It's worth putting up with them, just to be entertained by those who are unused to them.

Fortunately, I'm not one of those who has an allergic reaction to midgie bites - though I hate the beggars - but for many the threat is much more than irritation.

Actually, midgies are one of the reasons (excuses) for not stopping smoking. So one way or another, they'll get me in the end.

Mike
Glaikit. Bit nae sae glaikit as a gollach wi a blin ee.
Posted by:
Mike
Supporter
 
Posts: 535
Joined: Thu 23 Jan 2003 01:05 GMT
Location: Thurso, Scotland

Postby Kay » Sun 3 Aug 2003 15:26 GMT

Actually, midgies are one of the reasons (excuses) for not stopping smoking. So one way or another, they'll get me in the end.


Good point, Mike. Smoke also keeps mozzies away. And when the leeches started to attack on a Thai jungle trek, years ago, my non-smoking travelling companions were happy for me to help them out.

:D

C'mon, Dave, where's the smoking emoticon?
Not Delia - Foodie blog with lots of reviews and recipes.
Posted by:
User avatar
Kay
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15338
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 13:06 GMT
Location: Kent for a couple of years

Postby Purley » Sun 3 Aug 2003 15:32 GMT

My sister went to India a couple of years ago. I think it was Bombay. Anyway, they decided to go off to some tourist place which it eventually turned out was really for Indians and not for tourists. After surviving quite an adventure (by our standards) in getting there in a car with holes in the bottom and driving through rivers of mud as it was the monsoon season - they finally got to their destination. After being shown to their rooms they were given sticks. When they asked what the sticks were for they were told it was to beat off the monkeys while they were eating their breakfast.

I may have not got the story totally correct, but its pretty near.
There's loads more to see and do on British Expat— why not check out our home page?
Posted by:
Purley
Supporter
 
Posts: 1070
Joined: Mon 24 Mar 2003 14:07 GMT
Location: Regina

Postby Kay » Sun 3 Aug 2003 15:50 GMT

When they asked what the sticks were for they were told it was to beat off the monkeys while they were eating their breakfast.

I may have not got the story totally correct, but its pretty near.



It wouldn't surprise me at all, Liz. Monkeys can be a real pest. The worst thing is if they get into your house. Urgghh. And they can give a nasty bite too. (Luckily we've not had this problem ourselves although we know others who have.)

One of the problems is that to some people they are sacred, like cows. There are signs up saying that they're pests not deities and not to feed them - but what good does it do? :roll:

Kay
Not Delia - Foodie blog with lots of reviews and recipes.
Posted by:
User avatar
Kay
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15338
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 13:06 GMT
Location: Kent for a couple of years

Postby Squiffy » Sun 3 Aug 2003 17:12 GMT

Kay wrote:
Actually, midgies are one of the reasons (excuses) for not stopping smoking. So one way or another, they'll get me in the end.


Good point, Mike. Smoke also keeps mozzies away. And when the leeches started to attack on a Thai jungle trek, years ago, my non-smoking travelling companions were happy for me to help them out.

:D

C'mon, Dave, where's the smoking emoticon?


I thought this was the smoking emiticon?

:vomit:

Teehee
Squiffy - Laugh for MS - : http://www.shof.msrcsites.co.uk/
Posted by:
Squiffy
Supporter
 
Posts: 3610
Joined: Wed 30 Apr 2003 17:07 GMT
Location: House of Fun

Postby Squiffy » Sun 3 Aug 2003 17:18 GMT

When I went to visit my Brother and Nora in Nova Scotia in June 2001 we decided to go for a walk in on eof the many nature reserves.

Well, it was 90 odd degrees, humid and in that old forest near a beautiful lake I was just about bled dry by Black flies, extremely like Midges in Scotland.

Needless to say I like much better to walk there in the winter in -32 and 5 foot of snow, only thing likely to bite you then is a bear :lol: Blood loss might be about the same tho :P
Squiffy - Laugh for MS - : http://www.shof.msrcsites.co.uk/
Posted by:
Squiffy
Supporter
 
Posts: 3610
Joined: Wed 30 Apr 2003 17:07 GMT
Location: House of Fun

Postby justajester » Sun 3 Aug 2003 18:06 GMT

Tee hee... :wink:
Amor animi arbitrio sumitur, non punitor
Posted by:
justajester
Supporter
 
Posts: 1685
Joined: Mon 5 May 2003 20:08 GMT
Location: eastern Canada

Postby justajester » Sun 3 Aug 2003 18:54 GMT

I had occassion to go into the city two weeks ago while the spouse had some medical tests done prior to surgery. It was the day i had grandson number one for a "sleepover with Grandma" ,so he came along with Grandpa and i. After a wait of an hour or so he was getting a bit restless so i suggested we go to the natural history museum which was just across the street from the hospital. He enjoyed the snakes and fish, really liked the native displays and we had a wonderful couple of hours. As we walked toward the butterfly house, we saw that a cooking demonstration was just beginning. We were all settled in to watch when i noticed the sign saying it wold be an edible bug cooking class!! Yep, they cooked up a batch of mealworms :vomit: which for some reason only the youngsters tried...most of the adults used the same excuse i did... "i'd love to, but i just ate lunch and couldn't eat another bug...er...thing if i tried" . At the gift shop near the exit we DID stop in and Grandma was persuaded to buy a present for the other siblings...a bag of barbeque-flavoured mealworms...and some chocolate-covered ants for Mom :wink:
Amor animi arbitrio sumitur, non punitor
Posted by:
justajester
Supporter
 
Posts: 1685
Joined: Mon 5 May 2003 20:08 GMT
Location: eastern Canada

Postby chabrenas » Sun 3 Aug 2003 19:12 GMT

I'm not seriously allergic to midgie bites, but they do itch like hell and keep coming up again for about a week after I've been bitten. Perfect excuse to go inside and leave wifie doing the gardening from about 2 hours before sunset. African mosquito bites don't last more than a day on me.

Likewise, African hornets look frightening, but I'd far rather be bitten by them (all over in a couple of hours, and less painful in any case) than by a British/European wasp.

Canadian and North American mosquitoes are a different story....
Reminder: Premium Membership is required for access to private messages. Sign up now!
Posted by:
chabrenas
Free member
 
Posts: 762
Joined: Wed 22 Jan 2003 17:41 GMT
Location: France

Next

Return to Chinwags



cron