It is currently Fri 3 Apr 2020 12:12 GMT
Change font size

Chinwags

Newsletter editorial, Sep '11: Ladybirds

Talk about the weather, make new friends, comment on anything, pop in to say "hello". [Please DO NOT post country-specific questions here - they belong on the relevant country forum in the In-Country Experts Forum.]

Newsletter editorial, Sep '11: Ladybirds

Postby Dave » Fri 30 Sep 2011 11:18 GMT

The editorial in this month's newsletter is all about ladybirds - the gardener's friend, a creature with a special relationship with god and Jesus of Nazareth's mother, and the symbol adopted by a popular brand of children's clothing, an imprint of children's books and, er, a Dutch organisation against "senseless violence".

Do ladybirds loom large in the local culture where you live? Or is there another popular insect? We'd love to hear from you, so why not tell us about your favourite creepy-crawly? :D
British Newspapers Online - your handy guide to the UK's national, regional and local press!
ErgoGuides - Great travel and business eBooks from British Expat!
Posted by:
User avatar
Dave
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7267
Joined: Tue 21 Jan 2003 15:04 GMT
Location: Currently UK

Postby Dave » Fri 30 Sep 2011 11:56 GMT

As we mentioned at the tail end of the editorial, our own local lucky insects seem to be bees.

Shortly after we moved into our house nearly six years ago, I looked out of the window by my desk and saw that a large swarm of bees appeared to be building a nest in the eaves of our roof. Given our previous experience with bees in Delhi, it's perhaps understandable that we were a bit concerned about this.

So I hot-footed it to the compound office and asked the manager to come and take a look, which she duly did. She was delighted to tell me that we were very lucky and that bees nesting in the eaves of a house was a very good sign. We shouldn't worry about them as they would move on in two or three weeks.

Well, they did move on, but only after we'd severely depleted their numbers by leaving on the mosquito zapper by mistake one evening. They've been back several times since, and when they do they have an unfortunate tendency to stray inside the house at night (never more than one or two at a time) through a louvred ventilation window, even though it's covered by a mosquito screen. (How come the mosquitoes don't get in but the bees do? I still haven't figured that one out.)

They've never stung us yet, it's true, but it's still a bit disconcerting to know they're there in such large numbers.
British Newspapers Online - your handy guide to the UK's national, regional and local press!
ErgoGuides - Great travel and business eBooks from British Expat!
Posted by:
User avatar
Dave
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7267
Joined: Tue 21 Jan 2003 15:04 GMT
Location: Currently UK


Return to Chinwags



cron