Where would be best

Atlantic coast or Pacific coast? Prairies or cities? So many choices in a country of Canada's size... why not post here and discuss the options with others?

Where would be best

Postby Martyn&Laura » Tue 09 Jun 2009 13:43

Hi guys me and the family have decided to make a move to Canada, we qualify on the points system due to my wifes employment and qualifications, we ideally would like somewhere with alot of land (but dont want to spend a great deal of cash) we dont mind out of the way and lonely. No real preferance on whats around us but some heat and sun would be preferred, we dont get much in the North East of England as it is anyway. Thanks for your Help
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Postby Graeme » Tue 09 Jun 2009 14:02

Wow, huge question. I would suggest any of the prairie provinces, Northern BC, anywhere in Nova Scotia, Northern Ontario...basically anywhere in Canada could fit. Perhaps you need to take a trip out here and scout it out a bit. :)

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Postby Martyn&Laura » Tue 09 Jun 2009 14:16

British Columbia was where we looked first and seems ideal, we have seen adverts for farms with about 300 acres for about 300k but have not been able to find where they are, can you recommend any property websites at all :?:
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Postby Martyn&Laura » Tue 09 Jun 2009 14:32

This is ideally be what we want, but does anyone know what the area is like at all
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Postby carolinedraper » Tue 09 Jun 2009 17:26

Ok. I have to butt in here.

We own a working farm. We owned one in the UK too, and we come from outdoorsy families.

Do you have any experience of owning a farm even dog kennels or horse yard?

It is very different out here then in the UK. Imagine digging out snow from your door which is over your knees in height just to go outside to start the tractor up (which you have had to plug in using the block heater), just so you can clear the path to get to the fields to open the field gate to check on your animals. Then you have to dig around the gates to get them to open. Then you have to change the front bucket into the bale spears to hay out the animals. Also you have to manage a way to get water too them and crack any ice that is in their troughs. Then you have to plow your driveway (ours is over 400ft long) just to get the kids to the school bus pick up zone. All this has to be done before 8am (school bus comes at 8.30am), then in a few hours after another dumping of snow and some drifts you have to do it all again.

I hate to sound negative but really it was an eye opener to us and we had a farm in the UK.

Our dog lives outside all year round in a kennel system which is under a canvas cover to keep the snow off. Her water bowl is heated so does not freeze but the door to the run freezes up and the bottom gets covered under snow so you have to dig that out.

We love it but do cry sometimes e.g. I was heavily pregnant in Dec when our sheep were lambing but that was no excuse not to look after them and their needs in -38C plus wind chill. You cannot say "i do not fancy that today, or its snuggly in bed".

Life on a farm can be tough under the best situation just have your eyes open please.

Even if you do not have animals and rent your land out, then you have landlord responsibilities.

Also you cannot own a farm unless you have PR. Its a way of protecting farmers and farm land. So you cannot buy the property first.

Another point - you say you do not mind being in the middle of nowhere, please re think that. Our farm is down a road like many you find in Devon so we are not alone. Imagine having a problem in the middle of nowhere in a snow storm when the power goes out for 5 days. Your road is not plowed (as unless you are on a school route or commuting road) it is not legally obligating to do it.
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Postby Martyn&Laura » Tue 09 Jun 2009 18:41

Hi there it we wouldnt buy a property like that to use as a working farm (we probably wouldnt even want something that big), we would look at being as self sufficient as possible as we are in the UK. My family on and off have been based out in BC from stints in the army so theres a bit of expirence there at least. We intend to do it over the next 5 years (by then we should have paid off the majority off our debt) and during that time were going to try come out as much as possible year round so my wife can see whats its like, hopefully in the extremes.
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Postby tigger » Fri 12 Jun 2009 00:09

Hi. :shock: I still think you should listen to Carolinedraper - it is TOTALLY different out here and space, weather and lifestyle are very very different!!! :shock:

We were looking at the west coast but prices were too high so we did settle here in Ontario... We had our hearts set on the west side so even if you think you know where to live - you can change your mind!

Rural and survival are just in another league out here and we were advised initially live near 'life' as you get to learn how to live this wonderful Canadian lifestyle before making any decisions about where to live... A visit and trying before buying have been wise words and I would really advise it....

If you want to learn about Canada visit it and choose somewhere initially that allows you to learn about where you are living - make contacts and friends as it is then much easier to think of spreading your wings... We only had a house in the UK but we are renting here until we decide what to do.... We've had a few curve balls to deal with and are mighty glad we've been near supportive friends etc....

Sorry - I am repeating myself now - but the great thing about this site is the advice and do lots of reading and see what others have said too!!!

Tigger
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Postby Martyn&Laura » Sat 13 Jun 2009 19:40

I think so far we've decided to try and stay a month (time off work allowing) in different areas hopefully from next year 2 months a year. We wouldnt want somewhere cut off and isolated, Laura would get cabin fever, me im happy not to see anybody else from month to month, when i say being out of the way im talkin 10miles from a large town city (that to me in our current status is out of the way. We've really only started looking into this seriouslybut its been on the cards for a few years but we know it'll be a long learning curve.
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Postby carolinedraper » Mon 15 Jun 2009 18:53

I think you both need to decide what you want out of life and where you both see each other in a few years time. Also think about your children's needs.

Remember there are many options

1/ weather
2/ hills or plains
3/lake or sea
4/ time zone from UK

Once that is narrowed down then you can decide on land etc
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Postby tigger » Mon 15 Jun 2009 18:54

:wink: Just remember there is lots of good advice around to help you with your decision making. Good luck!

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