Nova Scotia

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Nova Scotia

Postby Greenyuk » Mon 05 Dec 2011 15:36

Hi all im new here signed up earlier. me and my wife are planing on moving to Canada in a couple of years. We are just waiting on my wife Holly to sort her training out, she is currently a team leader with a care home but will be doing her nursing to become a RN. I am currently an Electrician.
Basically we just want some advice on the Weather in Nova Scotia thats where we have been looking, We like the idea of lots of space and the rural lifestyle. We have read lots on the internet the last few weeks about Winter getting down to -6 or so. However we have also been told by people that it can be -40? so we basically thought we'd ask the locals to see what it is really like.

We want some heat in the summer and want snow in the winter :)
how much snow is normal?

Thank you for your help. Sorry If this is posted in the wrong section.
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Postby Greenyuk » Tue 06 Dec 2011 17:54

any one :)
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Postby Graeme » Tue 06 Dec 2011 20:28

Ideally you'd want Bernie to reply as he lives there, but he's not on here as much as he was. I live the other side of Canada about as far away from Nova Scotia as you are. All I can tell you is what I see on the news. The winters are cold and can easily get down to minus 20, summers can be warm, but not hot. The scenery is amazing, the people friendly and the cost of living very reasonable. My sister lives in PEI and loves it, I've been over to visit and it is very nice indeed, although it seemed like going back in time 20 years to me.
Let me know if you want some more info and I'll see what I can dig out.
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Postby Greenyuk » Thu 08 Dec 2011 17:59

Hi Graeme.
Thanks for your reply. -20 thats chillie lol but we can cope with that. we like i said the summer temps ive seen are 25 degree which is nice, and seems in line with what you say so thats good :)
just been looking at what needed to be an Electrician over there and how it differers form the uk.
your houses are ran on 110Volts is that right
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Postby Graeme » Thu 08 Dec 2011 20:28

That's correct we use 110, some of the heavier stuff can run on 220 using a 3 phase current whatever the heck that is. It makes kettles slower and drills not as powerful, but it sure hurts less when you inadvertently get zapped (experience speaking here).
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Postby Greenyuk » Fri 09 Dec 2011 00:42

Really you take 3 phase to get 220 thats different, out 3 phase he is 400 volt for really heavy stuff. will have to look into it more. cant have slow kettles lol need my tea ;) lol

Although like you say the risk of shock is greatly reduced the potential difference only being 55volt which is good. That is what we use on our building sites all the voltage is stepped down to 110 to make it safer :)
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Postby Graeme » Fri 09 Dec 2011 00:51

I know nothing about electrickery and the 3 phase thing might be wrong, I do remember a buddy of mine trying to explain it but it left me with a headache, the only thing that seemed to stick is a 3 phase 220...but as I said I might be wrong.
Sadly.
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Postby Buddyboy » Fri 10 Feb 2012 22:13

Greenyuk: My apologies for a slow response. Yes, I do live in Nova Scotia, having been here for the last ten years. Of all the provinces, this province is about the most temperate with summers that are not quite as hot and winters that are not quite as cold. With extremely rare exceptions, the coldest at night would be about minus 18C, the hotest in the day about +30C. We get our share of snow in the winter, but less than elsewhere. So far this winter we have had very, very little snow here on the South Shore of Nova Scotia, but we have about six inches forecast in a day or two's time.

Because Nova Scotia is small, southerly and with no real mountains, our average temperature is the warmest in Canada. Here's a clipping I set aside which describes it.
http://scotiahome.com/FTP%20BACKUP/WarmestProvince.html
But if you want to see snow, take a peek at these shots taken mainly in Quebec.
http://www.s241949051.onlinehome.us/FTP ... tures.html
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Postby Greenyuk » Fri 15 Jun 2012 22:56

Hi Buddyboy.
Now I must apologise for my very very late reply, I must admit I forgot.
The weather sounds great just what we are looking for really so thats good news.
Thank you very much for the reply and the links I will have a look.
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