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Making the most of the Internet

Ever thought of a vertical monitor screen?

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Ever thought of a vertical monitor screen?

Postby Kay » Mon 17 Mar 2014 09:20 GMT

There's an interesting piece on Mashable where the writer says that a vertical screen is more logical for today's Internet than the usual horizontal set up.

He makes his point with some examples. I can see what he's getting at and, yeah, I suppose its a good idea for some things. I'm just a slow adopter and don't plan to change my screen alignment any time soon.

What do you think?
http://mashable.com/2014/03/16/vertical-monitor/
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Postby JJ » Mon 17 Mar 2014 12:51 GMT

This is a subject close to my own heart, though as a more general problem of what to replace my monitors with when the big one (Dell 30") dies. Either side of it I have a 24" 1920x1200 in portrait, one for Outlook full screen and one for OneNote and IRC split top and bottom. To the far left is a 24" HD (1920x1080) in landscape for Facebook and opening reference material. It all looks very impressive when The Matrix screensaver kicks in. :-)

I like my main workspace to be widescreen but not 'cinemascope', so the 2560x1600 resolution is ideal, and two (or three) of them would probably be perfect, if a tad pricey. Thinking about prices, 24" or 26" HD gives the cheapest price per pixel at the moment. It comes down to the usage. Web browsing and reading probably work best in portrait, Outlook and Word are fine in either as the layout can be configured. The nature of what I do in Excel is such that landscape is essential and most other apps I run in sizable windows so it doesn't really matter. The clincher is Visual Studio where the toolbox and other windows layout virtually dictates landscape except that the last few versions have made this much more flexible so I might give it a go. Four screens across strains the neck and makes for typing errors as my body twists so the leading contenders are either three 27" HD (easier with ageing eyesight) in portrait or four in 2 x 2 format.

But then of course you get the new breed of ultra-wide monitors, usually 2560x1080, although I think their main appeal is for gaming.
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Postby Graeme » Mon 17 Mar 2014 14:02 GMT

In our local police station all the computers now have two screens, both wide screens, to be able to fit all the necessary data on screen for working on files etc. I guess if we wanted to go vertical we could always add another two screens on top :shock:
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Postby Dave » Tue 18 Mar 2014 02:26 GMT

I can sort of see the point, with the important proviso that you've got the hardware to be able to cope with a 1,000-pixel-wide website. Then again, I can imagine that - as the writer says - the last quarter or so of the screen doesn't get much use.

I've currently got two 1280x1024 monitors on my desk, which suits me fine for most purposes - more so than having a single widescreen monitor like Kay's. I suspect that rotating them would start to squash things up a little. Two 1200x1920 monitors might be nice.

I remember a description of Terry Pratchett's setup about six years ago (the second photo in the gallery accompanying this article) where he had about six monitors on the go. Wild!
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Postby Kay » Tue 18 Mar 2014 04:59 GMT

Terry probably got used to that set up before tools like Scrivener came out.

Scrivener helps writers to get organised. It normally costs $40 (depending on which version) and the Linux version is free.

This is its official site.
http://www.literatureandlatte.com/scrivener.php

AppSumo has a special offer on just now (time limited) so you can get it for $20.
http://www.appsumo.com/scrivener/
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Postby ruggie » Mon 20 Oct 2014 13:43 GMT

Some DTP packages were designed for portrait-oriented monitors in the old days. Today, I reckon the critical characteristic is to have enough pixels available (on multiple monitors or one large one), to handle what you have on your desktop, plus the maximum number and size of windows you need open and active simultaneously. There are cases where you need a specific monitor for high-function graphics, but other than that I reckon the best interface would include a way of zooming rapidly in to a window when you select it.
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